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jtotheizzoe:

"Spin Spot… now stay. Hey! I said stay!"
Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is shrinking, and scientists aren’t sure exactly why. The massive, rust-red storm resides in Jupiter’s southern hemisphere, a cyclone of unknown crimson gases swirling around at hundreds of kilometers per hour.
At its largest, the Great Red Spot was wide enough to hold three Earths within its boundaries, but according to the latest observations it would (only!) barely hold more than one Earth. It’s unknown if the spot is set to disappear completely, but scientists are watching its evolution closely.

As familiar as it is to us, there’s no reason to think the spot has always been there, or that it always will be. Its first confirmed observation comes from Giovanni Cassini in 1665, seen in his sketches below (the spot is flipped vertically because that’s what telescope lenses do!):

German astronomer Samuel Heinrich Schwabe saw it again as early as 1831, and it was certainly prominent in the 1880’s when Étienne Trouvelot was drawing his gorgeous planetary pastels:

This persistence has led us to believe that it is a long-lasting feature that was there long before we ever saw it, and would therefore continue to ≥ BE there, you know? I mean, what is Jupiter without its spot?
Of course, we know better. Just because it has always been there doesn’t mean that it always will be. Indeed, there are reports that suggest that the Red Spot has fluctuated greatly in size before, perhaps even disappearing altogether for decades at a time. 
In fact, a new spot in the region, nicknamed “Red Spot Jr.” (technically named Oval BA), has popped up in the past decade or so, and may one day overtake its older sibling in size and intensity: 

If you’d like to learn more about the science behind the shrinking spot, check out this article at Bad Astronomy. Also be sure to catch this Google Hangout discussion on the fate of the featuring some Jovian astronomers and brought to you by the folks at HubbleSite (embedded below): 

What will be the ultimate fate of the Great Red Spot? We don’t know… yet. In the meantime, we are wise to remember that nothing in this universe lasts forever, so we should savor its beauty while we can:

jtotheizzoe:

"Spin Spot… now stay. Hey! I said stay!"

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is shrinking, and scientists aren’t sure exactly why. The massive, rust-red storm resides in Jupiter’s southern hemisphere, a cyclone of unknown crimson gases swirling around at hundreds of kilometers per hour.

At its largest, the Great Red Spot was wide enough to hold three Earths within its boundaries, but according to the latest observations it would (only!) barely hold more than one Earth. It’s unknown if the spot is set to disappear completely, but scientists are watching its evolution closely.

As familiar as it is to us, there’s no reason to think the spot has always been there, or that it always will be. Its first confirmed observation comes from Giovanni Cassini in 1665, seen in his sketches below (the spot is flipped vertically because that’s what telescope lenses do!):

German astronomer Samuel Heinrich Schwabe saw it again as early as 1831, and it was certainly prominent in the 1880’s when Étienne Trouvelot was drawing his gorgeous planetary pastels:

This persistence has led us to believe that it is a long-lasting feature that was there long before we ever saw it, and would therefore continue to ≥ BE there, you know? I mean, what is Jupiter without its spot?

Of course, we know better. Just because it has always been there doesn’t mean that it always will be. Indeed, there are reports that suggest that the Red Spot has fluctuated greatly in size before, perhaps even disappearing altogether for decades at a time

In fact, a new spot in the region, nicknamed “Red Spot Jr.” (technically named Oval BA), has popped up in the past decade or so, and may one day overtake its older sibling in size and intensity: 

If you’d like to learn more about the science behind the shrinking spot, check out this article at Bad Astronomy. Also be sure to catch this Google Hangout discussion on the fate of the featuring some Jovian astronomers and brought to you by the folks at HubbleSite (embedded below): 

What will be the ultimate fate of the Great Red Spot? We don’t know… yet. In the meantime, we are wise to remember that nothing in this universe lasts forever, so we should savor its beauty while we can:

Source: jtotheizzoe
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awwww-cute:

My 12 year old pit bull got a new friend

Source: awwww-cute
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blackhaireverywhere:

crimsong19:

consultingpiskies:

Jessica Williams speaks with Sgt. Jasmine Jacobs about Army regulation AR 670-1

Jessica Williams and Travon (one of the staff writers) do it again!

This is why white women can’t be in the natural hair movement

(via killsmedead)

Source: consultingpiskies
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"This is what frustrates me…People don’t like Sansa because she is feminine. It annoys me that people only like the feminine characters when they act like male characters. And they always go on about feminism. Like, you’re rooting for the people who look like boys, who act like boys, who fight like boys. Root for the girls who wear dresses and are intellectually very strong."

Source: hesterasamoore
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occupation-prophet:

classicsenthusiast:

thegetty:

Advice for men on how to pick up the ladies from Ovid’s Ars Amatoria

Now find your reason for friendly conversation, and first of all engage in casual talk.
If by chance a speck of dust falls in the girl’s lap, as it may, let it be flicked away by your fingers: and if there’s nothing, flick away the nothing: let anything be a reason for you to serve her.
Corrupt her with promises, and with prayers: you’ll easily get what you want, if she wishes.

(Detail) Oil Jar with Paris and Helen, 420 - 400 B.C., Attributed to the Painter of the Frankfort Acorn, vase-painter; and Phintias, potter, Greek, Athens, Terracotta. J. Paul Getty Museum.

The Ars Amatoria is probably one of the skeeviest “how to get a girl” handbooks I ever seen, including tips like “keep going after her even if you have to use force, she’ll appreciate the effort” and “pretend you like the same things she likes,” or, my personal favorite, “cry to make her feel sorry for you.” 

Although not a great handbook for modern audiences, it does show just how little we’ve progressed in some ways over the past 2,000 years when it comes to gender relations.

Here’s a link to a post I made about this a while back:

The Original Misogynistic Guide for Assholes

by Ovid (as translated by Peter Green)

(via themarysue)

Source: thegetty
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jtotheizzoe:

sci-universe:

Neil’s words from the last episode of “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey”

Same.

Source: sci-universe
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PUPPY GRUB FACES AND GRUB FEETS.

(via olloollo)

Source: zrinkacvitesic
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leepacey:

a restaurant in my hometown got a review that said the servers should “show some skin” so the owner added a potato skin special to the menu and all the proceeds from the special go to the west virginia foundation for rape information services (x)

(via thegirlwithgoldeyes)

Source: leepacey
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aplacetolovedogs:

Someone just dumped this puppy off so he is now ours :) His name is cricket! We love him so much already, I’m glad we found him and he’s safe and happy now :)haleydill18

Visit our poster store Rover99.com


Source: aplacetolovedogs